Historic cyclone deluges Los Angeles, triggering hundreds of mudslides 

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One of the wettest cyclones in South California history unleashed at least 475 mudslides in the Los Angeles area after leaving around half the amount of precipitation the city usually gets in a season in only two days, and officers alerted Tuesday that the danger was not over yet.
One of the wettest cyclones in South California history unleashed at least 475 mudslides in the Los Angeles area after leaving around half the amount of precipitation the city usually gets in a season in only two days, and officers alerted Tuesday that the danger was not over yet.

One of the wettest cyclones in South California history unleashed at least 475 mudslides in the Los Angeles area after leaving around half the amount of precipitation the city usually gets in a season in only two days, and officers alerted Tuesday that the danger was not over yet.

During an evening news conference, Mayor Karen Bass voiced concerns over the saturated hillsides in Los Angeles, warning that even light rainfall could trigger additional mudslides. She emphasized the continued risk of ground shifting even after the rain subsides.

Relief Amidst Storm Damage

Officials expressed relief that the storm, while severe, had not resulted in any fatalities or major catastrophes in Los Angeles. 

However, nearly 400 trees were uprooted, and seven deaths were reported elsewhere in California, including incidents of individuals being crushed by fallen trees and swept away by swollen rivers.

Ongoing Flood Risk and Recovery Efforts

Despite the rainfall tapering off, a flood watch was extended through early Wednesday due to the already waterlogged ground from consecutive atmospheric rivers. Another heavy rain burst was expected Wednesday evening before the region begins to dry out, according to meteorologists.

Focus on Recovery and Federal Aid

Mayor Bass stated that the city is now shifting focus towards recovery efforts and will seek federal assistance, including emergency vouchers for homeless individuals in shelters. 

Additionally, efforts will be made to secure FEMA funding to aid residents whose homes were damaged in hillside communities not covered by insurance. Assessing the extent of damage may take some time.

Status of Buildings and Potential Damages

As of Tuesday, seven buildings were deemed uninhabitable, while another 10 were yellow-tagged, allowing residents to retrieve belongings but prohibiting them from staying due to damage. 

Mayor Bass expressed hope that further homes would not be affected, but noted that it was too early to determine the full extent of potential damages.

Gary Monroe

Gary Monroe is a seasoned contributor to the Los Angeles Business Magazine, where he offers insightful analysis on local business trends and economic developments. With a focus on Los Angeles' dynamic commercial landscape, Gary's articles provide valuable perspectives for entrepreneurs and business professionals in the city.

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